• Download mobile app
20 Mar 2019, Edition - 1345, Wednesday

Trending Now

  • Gang rape: Punjab and Haryana high court says sell convicts’ assets
  • First-time voters not interested in dynasty, they are interested in development: PM Modi to party workers
  • PM’s ‘chowkidar’ campaign meant to hide failures: Congress
  • In a first, Maharashtra state EC appoints transgender activist Gauri Sawant as election ambassador

Coimbatore

Accident death of a minor: Who is responsible?

Indrani Thakurata

Bengaluru: “Today’s youngsters are always exploring. They need adventure and constant rush. And the society that they live in is constantly keeping them on their toes–with influences from cinema, gadgets and many more. So, it is for us, parents to keep a tab on them, ensure they aren’t mislead into things that can be fatal,” says Pradeepthi Vissamsetti, Team member of Sahaja, Lifestyle Designers who counsel children on issues that affect them–in response to a question on who should take the blame in the case of the recent accident that killed a minor. Incase you haven’t read, a recent accident of a minor left many Bangaloreans shocked. The grim details of the death is straight out of some gory film. A race involving three teenagers on Hosur Road Elevated Expressway with borrowed vehicles from parents ended up in the death of one of the three, near Roopena Agrahara, southeast Bengaluru, on Sunday.

Seventeen year old student of a private college, Arfhan Salim, 17, from HSR Layout was beheaded as his vehicle hit a row of barricades placed in the median of the road and his head hit them. Anirudh K, and Srinvas G, his two other friends survived miraculously without injuries. “The details of the accident is horrific. The reports reveal that the three used to go for late night drives often without the knowledge of the parents. But I wonder, How come the parents didn’t know of it at all? I read out the report to my child, and made him aware of the worst consequences,” says Shiva C, a mother of a minor. She adds, “The other two who escaped miraculously are very lucky. But the incident will haunt them for the rest of their life. They aren’t kids to not understand city limits. They should know that these aren’t places to race, we don’t have racing tracks. If you don’t die, you will end up killing someone.” Echoing the same sentiments, Jayshree Chakravarthy, a teacher says, “Some parents don’t object to the stereotypical images of boys who love speed. We take pride if our boys dwell in speed, gizmos and gadgets–sometimes at the cost of their own well being. All children should know that speeding inside the city is not acceptable. And dare they do it under the permissible age. These are lessons that a society needs to teach along with parents and teachers. Influences are many, I am struggling to drill sense into my teenage son and all my students too.” Expressing regret at the incident, Rupankar Chakraborty says, “It is unfortunate that the child lost his life. Life is precious, it shouldn’t be thrown away like this. For me, parents are responsible. But, as a 16-year-olds, they should have applied themselves too. So, technically, blame the society.”

Police filed a case against the boys, who drove the cars, and their fathers for allowing minors to drive their vehicles.

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

COIMBATORE WEATHER